I have been divorced from my ex for 4 yrs now but remain friends with him and see him often. I recently learned that my ex in laws have a heavy bed bug infestation. My ex lives 3 houses away but is at his mothers every day as they are elderly. He has been dealing with the bugs and my ex’s petulance about the bugs. They have doctors appointments coming up and I wonder if they should tell the doctor about this. My ex has tried to get them to bathe more, treat the bites, wash the clothes but they act as if it is a big imposition to them. I have not asked him over since I found out about them and am reluctant to do so. Am I wrong in thinking that the ex in laws can spread them to others at the doctors office and is it possible for my ex to bring them here?
I’ve found that the locoid lipocream he gave me to be the most effective. He also gave a sample of foaming medication in a small can which didn’t seem to work. The swollen areas were much worse that you would imagine, I experienced flat out pain by nighttime. I treated my arm 3x that day with the lipocream and by morning it was 100x better with significantly reduced redness and swelling.
For about 3 almost 4 weeks now something has been bitting me around my ankles and feet. My fiancé hasnt been bit by anything and if he has he can’t tell. I took all sheets off the bed, found nothing. i have no idea if its bed bugs or fleas. But the itching is driving me insane. My fianc roommate did bring a stray kitten into the house not to long ago, and I’m thinking its fleas. But I don’t know for a 100%. I have a couple bites on my arms but mainly on ankles and feet.there is no carpet in house, just hardwood and one rug in living rm. I saw 2 tiny tiny bugs last night, but I couldn’t grab them in time. Pplease help its driving me insane and grossing me out
To treat an allergic reaction, the doctor may prescribe an antihistamine, corticosteroid, or epinephrine injection. If the area is infected, he or she might prescribe an antibiotic or recommend an over-the-counter antiseptic. Finally, if it’s severe itchiness that you’re dealing with, applying corticosteroid or taking an antihistamine in pill or liquid form may be able to help.
I am freaking out. I woke up with one bump on my hand yesterday and tonight at about 2am i woke up with my hand itching again…there is a swollen lump about an inch away from yesterdays bump and then there are two swollen itchy lumps right by my wrist…there is also a swollen itchy lump on my chin… I am freaking out because i work in people’s homes so i always have this fear of bringing something home and recently a client hadn’t some bites on her back that looked similar to this. They went down as I rubbed alcohol. Ive had bites at a friends house similar to this n there are lots of spiders where she lives. It doesnt look like bed bigs but maybe some kind of house spider maybe getting to me at night(im in philadelphia). But again swelling and extremely itchy. I dont see bed big signs on my bed or anything can i email u a pic of my hand and face? I am itching so badly amd i cannot turn the lights back out and fall to sleep im paranoid. I cant stand any bugs.
Thank you all for the advice I’m seeing on here. Hydrocortisone was doing nothing for these bites. I have a high tolerance for pain but these bites really made me want to cry. I tried the Veeno Oatmeal bath, Witch Hazel and the Aloe Vera and this is when I began to get relief. These bites were very uncomfortable. I still itch a little but the swelling has gone down tremendously. I keep the Aloe Vera and witch hazel handy for the itching.

No money whatsoever to do anything about it. I’m out of work and can’t even pay my rent. If we mention the infestation to the landlord he’ll toss us out because he’s in the process of selling the building. I’m going to try and go to an urgent care place to see if I can at least get something to stop the itching. This is driving me crazy with all the itching.
No one tactic alone will be effective. A good pest control operator will develop a strategy to deal with the bed bugs that takes the particulars of the setting into account, and will return several times to check on progress. Dry ice sprays that freeze bed bugs have limited potential to reach hidden bugs. Steam has somewhat better penetrating ability. The downside of steam is that it leaves moisture behind. Dry ice doesn't leave any residue at all. Vacuuming has a role, but it has limitations, too. Some insecticides leave behind deposits that are slow to act but are effective in the long-term. Other insecticides kill on contact, but only reach insects that are in view. Insecticide resistance makes the choice of tactics more difficult.

The bed bug is a universal problem yet it can be dealt with on a regular basis. used items and new items carry bed bugs. always wash and dry for 20 min. ( its the heat that kills the bug). bed pillows need to be washed and dried on a regular basis and the beds head board are full of body skin cells that attract the bugs. a good old cleaning with vaccum and wipe down is needed. keep your vac cleaned and bag empty after each use, the bugs are in the vac.


If you are experiencing itching, burning, and other forms of pain, there are a couple of treatment methods you could try. The most common recommendation is a topical corticosteroid cream or an anesthetic, which are applied directly to the wound and rubbed in to provide relief from the itching. A possible alternative to corticosteroids is calamine cream, though the FDA isn’t convinced of its effectiveness.
An allergy refers to a misguided reaction by our immune system in response to bodily contact with certain foreign substances. When these allergens come in contact with the body, it causes the immune system to develop an allergic reaction in people who are allergic to it. It is estimated that 50 million North Americans are affected by allergic conditions. The parts of the body that are prone to react to allergies include the eyes, nose, lungs, skin, and stomach. Common allergic disorders include hay fever, asthma, allergic eyes, allergic eczema, hives, and allergic shock.
Bed bug infestations are primarily the result of two species of insects from genus Cimex: Cimex lectularius (the common bed bug) and Cimex hemipterus.[3] These insects feed exclusively on blood and may survive a year without eating.[3] Adult Cimex are light brown to reddish-brown, flat, oval, and have no hind wings. The front wings are vestigial and reduced to pad-like structures. Adults grow to 4–5 mm (0.16–0.20 in) long and 1.5–3 mm (0.059–0.118 in) wide.

The best way to confirm that the bites are from bed bugs is to find other evidence of a bed bug infestation. Common telltale signs can be found on or near your mattress: pull up your sheets and check the seams and folds for thin black fecal streaks or small red blood spots. You might also find bed bugs, living or dead, and their discarded shells in various hiding places, such as the joints of your bed frame.


Reactions to bed bug bites differ from person to person from none to a full-blown allergic reaction. A mild reaction may reveal flat, red bumps at the bite sites. A more severe reaction may include an irritating itch (as in my case), or swelling. Resisting the itch is incredibly difficult, but giving in to it can cause severe irritation to the skin, increasing your risk for an infection. It’s the chemicals in the bed bug’s saliva that trigger such reactions, some lasting more than two weeks.
Excessively scratching the itchy, bitten areas also may increase the chance of a secondary skin infection. Antiseptic creams or lotions can be used to ward off infection and antihistamines can be used to treat the itching. And an infestation can take a psychological toll on those affected: People whose homes have been infested with bedbugs may have trouble sleeping for fear of being bitten in the night. There are also public health, social and economic consequences; office buildings and schools often have to close if they are dealing with a bedbug infestation.
High there I’ve been looking on the net for a while now about pictures on the marks I have now I know full well bed bug bites come on the arms, neck, face etc but I have marks on my chest, stomach, arms, legs, and a couple on my face but the thing is some of them look like zits but the others don’t and they keep coming I do in fact have sensitive skin too but people think I’m crazy because of my speculation to bed bugs I do feel pricks on my skin so its not just because I have sensitive skin there’s something else that’s making it go so much more crazy but I do know better some of the marks has an blood mark others with swelling others with swelling with the blood mark on the tip top as an example the marks many of them look like the (Many Small Bite Marks) picture but all over my body. please help I’m losing a lot of sleep because of this ordeal.
Jump up ^ John Southall. "That soon after the Fire of London, in some of the new-built Houses they were observ'd to appear, and were never noted to have been seen in the old, tho' they were then so few, as to be little taken notice of; yet as they were only seen in Firr-Timber, 'twas conjectured they were then first brought to England in them; of which most of the new Houses were partly built, instead of the good Oak destroy'd in the old". A Treatise of Buggs [sic], pp. 16–17. Retrieved 1 December 2016.

The size of bed bug bites varies with a number of different factors. Bed bugs inject an anti-coagulant along with their saliva when they pierce the skin to take a blood meal. This anti-coagulant is mostly responsible for how a person reacts to the bite and determines the size of the bug’s bite. Since people will have various sensitivities to the bed bug’s bite, the size of the bite will vary, as well. Another factor that influences the size of a bed bug reaction is the number of times a person is bitten. Bite reactions of people bitten many times are also variable, and their response may be either more or less intense as the number of bites increases.
×