We vacuumed up the nests and I went in with a blowdryer after that to attempt to kill the eggs. A few hours later, we also sprayed the nests with KABOOM spray, a bleach for clothing. Ever since then, there has been a huge lack of bed bugs. I have found very few adults, and the ones that we have found, have either been /dead/, or dying. We have found hatchlings, but I consider this a good sign, though, as this is showing that what we’re doing is working. I’ve been spraying the KABOOM around where I sleep on the floor since then, and I’ve been able to find a kill any of them that have bitten me for the most part over the past few nights.(I sleep on the floor in the living room because it’s better than sleeping up in my room where we haven’t gotten to yet)
Bedbug bites usually do not require any treatment. If you develop itching of the skin around the site of the bite, you can use an over-the-counter antihistamine pill or cream such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl). Some individuals may also experience relief from the itching by applying a hot washcloth directly to the affected area. Try to avoid scratching the skin, as this can cause skin breakdown and a subsequent secondary bacterial skin infection.
Very worry about my daughter.Wnt on a trip to Georgia and south Carolina 13 days ago.As soon and we came back started having rash wrist and forearmas.Vry itchy.Have been extending to legs ,shoulder bladdes and upper arms.Doctors not sure if a bed bus bite or scabies.My grandsone have a few bites but it seems to get better.Thest rest of the group seems to be ok.
I personally did not know about bedbugs or how to treat bites. I and my family have suffered the trauma of dealing with this problem. I have little knowledge of bedbugs. It has been a very bad experience to my family. I have had to throw away many items that was precious to me. Giving up all the mattress in my home. Sleeping on the floor with jackets, socks, long pants, and long shirts. My son is has asthma. I have a major concern with his health. My family is my major concern.
Bed bugs often hide in seams, folds and crevices of mattresses, box springs, bed frames and headboards. A thorough inspection requires dismantling the bed so that upper and lower seams and surfaces can be examined. Things to look for are the bugs themselves, shed skins of the nymphs (immature bed bugs), and the blackish fecal spots. The dark spots of dried bed bug excrement are often present along mattress seams or wherever the bugs have resided. Box springs afford many places for bed bugs to hide, especially along the upper seams and underneath, where the bottom edge of the box rests on the frame. If an underlying dust cover is present, it may have to be removed to gain access for inspection and possible treatment. Successful treatment of mattresses and box springs can be difficult, however, and infested ones may need to be discarded or encased in a protective cover. 
Hey Jessica! Sounds like bed bug bites to me but don’t stress, although bed bugs are known to travel with you from other locations its not a guarantee that they always do. I recommend giving all your clothing a hot wash when you get back home (and your travel bags) and to inspect your bed for signs of their presence. As a precautionary measure, you can put DE under your sheets for a day or two and that will kill any pests that are hiding there. Good luck

I am now living in Kuwait far from my family, I was helpless and don’t know what to do, i was chatting w/ my mom and told her about my problem regarding the red spot comes out on my the under arm, i was crying for help coz i though i am sick.. my mother was so worried about me, until i decided search on internet related to my problem that doing facebook… i found this site then now i know it’s bed bug i think i took it from my friend room when i was slept there and I’m not dying as what i thought.. But my problem is i can’t wear backless dress, short pants because of the scar … anyone can help me how to remover this scar? it’s too disaster.
While the former methods are helpful, insecticides are widely used by most pest control companies. A variety of EPA-registered materials are available formulated as liquids, dusts and aerosols. Baits used to control ants and cockroaches are ineffective in this case since bed bugs must bite and feed on blood. Professional-use insecticides such as Temprid®, Transport® and Phantom® tend to be more effective than bed bug sprays sold by retailers. Bleach, alcohol, cigarette lighters, etc. should NOT be used to control bed bugs. Besides being ineffective, such actions can result in fires and other dangerous outcomes.   
While cleaning up infested areas will be helpful in controlling bedbugs, getting rid of them usually requires chemical treatments. Because treating your bed and bedroom with insecticides can be harmful, it is important to use products that can be used safely in bedrooms. Do not treat mattresses and bedding unless the label specifically says you can use them on bedding.
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