i kno what most of yall ppl saying ….i recently stood over a friends house and my bestfriends brother bed was infested but i never knew it was so we bunked together. I stayed over ther for 3 days. The friday i came home stayed in for the weekend and bam monday morning woke up outta my sleep with the most painful itching ever! it got bad within hours

Hello, i was worried that we had bed bugs in our room and i hired an exterminator to come in and have a look. He said there was no evidence of bedbugs. And also because the bites were really only on the torso. Regardless, a few months later we had the opportunity to change the entire bedroom set and cleaned all the sheets on sanitize cycle – the bites all went away. Now, however, about 6 months later they seem to be coming back. Does this sound like a bed bug issue to you? If so, now what should we do? I cant but another bedroom set.
The Internet abounds with so-called miracle cures for bed bugs. But bed bugs are hard to get rid of, so anything that advertises an immediate solution is not accurate—it's snake oil. These "cures" have included (as reported by pest control operators who come in afterward to tackle bed bugs correctly) using bleach, ammonia and even DIY heat treatment, which carries fire risk.
Both of these types of Hemiptera are sensitive to extreme temperatures. It may be necessary to rid the infestation by exposing the area to extreme heat or cold; they are most comfortable in temperatures around eighty degrees Fahrenheit. Raising the temperature to ninety-seven to ninety-nine degrees may kill off a significant portion of the population.

 Adult bed bugs are about 3/16” long and reddish-brown, with oval-shaped, flattened bodies. They are sometimes mistaken for ticks, cockroaches, carpet beetles or other household insects. The immature bed bugs (nymphs) resemble the adults, but are smaller and lighter in color. Bed bugs do not fly, and they don’t jump like fleas do ― but they can crawl rapidly over floors, walls, ceilings and other surfaces. Adult females lay their eggs in secluded places, depositing 1, 2 or more eggs per day, potentially hundreds during their lifetime. The eggs are tiny (about the size of a dust spec), whitish and hard to see without magnification, especially on light-colored surfaces. When first laid, the eggs are sticky, causing them to adhere to surfaces. At room temperatures, bed bug eggs hatch in about a week. Newly emerged nymphs are straw-colored and no bigger than a pinhead.


I never had a problem with bed bugs until my neighbor came over. I didn’t even know she had them until this past Thursday (02/09/2017). She had a brand new bedroom suit she got from Arron’s and they were putting it on the truck. Next thing I knew, they were taking it back off and putting it on the porch. We live in apartme ts so we share a porch. Anyways I asked her why they did that, and it was like she was proud of the fact that she had them. Now I have bites on my upper forearm, and I have treated my house. She knew she had them and never said anythjng. Is there something that I can do about her knowing and not saying anything? I have grandchildren that come over on the weekends.
No one tactic alone will be effective. A good pest control operator will develop a strategy to deal with the bed bugs that takes the particulars of the setting into account, and will return several times to check on progress. Dry ice sprays that freeze bed bugs have limited potential to reach hidden bugs. Steam has somewhat better penetrating ability. The downside of steam is that it leaves moisture behind. Dry ice doesn't leave any residue at all. Vacuuming has a role, but it has limitations, too. Some insecticides leave behind deposits that are slow to act but are effective in the long-term. Other insecticides kill on contact, but only reach insects that are in view. Insecticide resistance makes the choice of tactics more difficult.
There are thousands of types of spiders (technically arachnids and not insects) crawling around the U.S., but only two of them–the black widow and the brown recluse–can cause serious problems, and even those are rare. Most of the time you’ll see red bumps that hurt and itch if you’re bitten by a spider. Very few people get the severe pain and cramping of a widow bite or the decaying ulcers of a recluse bite (although if you do, get medical help right away).
I think the lice/bedbug/flea killing shampoo and gel I’ve been using accounts for me not getting munched on that terribly…as i stated earlier the worst of it seems to be over and I’m going to keep using gold bonds and neosporin. I had a few other topical anti itch creams lying around and while they’ve helped some…nothing soothes like the golds bond. I feel very lucky that I’m not bitten in anyplace visible. my right bicep was where i was bit the most (besides my feet)…which is also the side i sleep on.
Three days after the initial “feeding” the sores hurt really bad. They itch like no other. By the way, none of my roommates have experienced this. I started panicking and washed all my clothes and sheets. I checked every corner of my room. Nothing. I couldn’t find anything, so them things must be hiding pretty well. Unless it isn’t bedbugs. Today I woke up and realized I had three more bites on my arm just above my elbow in the “breakfast, lunch, and dinner” pattern this site talks about.

However, another thing which has helped me with the intense itching is a regular hair brush! I was scratching so much that I grabbed the hair brush and used that to cover more territory! I have found that even if I “brush” intensely, it will not bleed and slowly the itching will subside. I have also heard of a quirky aid in “bug direction”…..used dryer sheets will discourage bugs from the area….what I saw was the sheets tucked in between the mattress and box spring by each bedpost.

Don't assume your bites are bedbugs. Bites can be hard to identify, even for doctors. Rule out mosquitoes, fleas, mites, and biting gnats by conducting a visual inspection. It's best to collect and identify bedbugs to confirm bites. Look for the bugs themselves or their bloodstains, especially along the seams of mattresses. Further, look for dark spots of insect waste where bedbugs might crawl into hiding places on furniture, walls, and floors.
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