Chances are, you or someone you know has had a run-in with bed bugs. It might have happened in a scrupulously clean bedroom. Or maybe it was a hotel room, office or college dorm. In the February issue of Scientific American entomologist Kenneth Haynes of the University of Kentucky explains how, after a lengthy absence, bed bugs are staging a comeback. The good news is scientists are intensively studying these insects, and their insights suggest novel ways of detecting the bugs and eradicating infestations. Some of those potential solutions are a long way off, however. In the meantime the best bet is to avoid bringing bed bugs home in the first place. I called Haynes to ask him how to do that and what to do if one suspects an infestation (eek!), among a bunch of other practical-minded questions.
The problem with this idea of yours the BuggedOut’s Bed Bud AIDS Cure Dialysis Machine is that the blood in a bed bug is dead blood. That is why it is red and since HIV is a virus which is also alive it guess what…. yep you guessed it ^_< Live Blood which has Live white blood cells in it which is where HIV the virus that gives you AIDS lives and when they die………………. get the picture. The second problem and also the reason HIV hasn’t been cured yet is even if we could clean HIV from the blood with Dialysis or some other method like the medicine they prescribe today, is that HIV is able to move between what is called the blood brain barrier where we are unable to do, with medication or any other means and so the HIV virus hides in it and even if your bed bug machine was to work and you cleaned the blood of HIV and then put it back in the person soon as it you did the virus would come running out the brain barrier to greet & infect it………
A variety of low-odor sprays, dusts, and aerosol insecticides help with bed bug control. People must apply these pesticides to all areas where the bugs are observed as well as hiding places or spaces where they may crawl. The pest control company can help you determine if an infested mattress can be disinfected or must be discarded. Since beds cannot readily be treated with insecticides, it's often necessary to discard infested mattresses and beds.
Bed bugs do not transmit MRSA. Although there have been reports of persons developing methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, such as boils or abscesses associated with bed bug bites, it turns out the bed bugs really weren't directly at fault. Rather, the cases of MRSA infections associated with bed bug bites are actually an example of scratching leading to minor skin trauma and subsequent secondary bacterial infections. In these cases, people who are carriers of MRSA scratch at the itchy bite sites and provide a port of entry for the MRSA (which was already present on their skin) to get in and under the skin and cause the secondary infection. While it can be blamed for some other bed bug symptoms like itching and red welts, the bed bug cannot be blamed for the infection.
Quote: Similarly, bed bugs will perish in extremely cold temperatures. If it is possible to keep a room unheated for a prolonged period of time, it may kill the population. All stages of the common bed bug, from nymphs to adults, can survive for up to five days in temperatures of fourteen degrees Fahrenheit. Prolonged exposure, however, to these temperatures, will kill them.
Bed bugs are an increasing cause for litigation.[69] Courts have, in some cases, exacted large punitive damage judgments on some hotels.[70][71][72] Many of New York City's Upper East Side home owners have been afflicted, but they tend to be silent publicly in order not to ruin their property values and be seen as suffering a blight typically associated with the lower classes.[73]
Dusts have been used to ward off insects from grain storage for centuries, including plant ash, lime, dolomite, certain types of soil, and diatomaceous earth or Kieselguhr.[60] Of these, diatomaceous earth in particular has seen a revival as a nontoxic (when in amorphous form) residual pesticide for bed bug abatement. While diatomaceous earth performed poorly, silica gel may be effective.[61][62]
I dealt with these creatures for over 7 months. thought I was going crazy. 3 doctors- allergist-GP, dermatoligist. was treated for scabies as well. every day 2-3 new bites. some days none. i did the diaclamateous earth- alcohol- website bed bug kikkers. Finally, I actually saw 3 in a box. then i called an exterminator- for bedbugs. showed him the box he came 4 times – every sat for a month. something to do with how they reproduce. luckily this was a good man and he charged 300.00 and guaranteed it. i ripped out the carpet- the baseboards- everything in my room. only saw maybe 20 bugs in total. he said i had been treating them so that was why there were so few. Finally they are gone- 2 months now. I was the only one getting bitten- my husband did not until the very end and not nearly like me. The drs do not know for sure what the bites are when we go. and when we traet ourselves we kill them… but they hatch and are not gone. Had I known i would have gladly paid the 300 in the 1st place as these things nearly made me crazy. Just my story
Conventional insect repellents, like those used to deter ticks and mosquitoes, do not appear to be as effective against bed bugs. Therefore, attempting to avoid being bitten by applying insect repellent at bedtime is not recommended. Sleeping with the lights on is also not likely to deter hungry bed bugs, as they will adjust their feeding cycle to the host’s sleeping patterns. 

Run hot water as hot as you can take it. When its hot enough for you, run the hot water over your bites. Yes it does burn a little, but you’ll feel relief from the hot water drawing the “itch” out. Do this for about 10-15 seconds and then immediately switch to very cold water and run that over it. The shock to your skin from going from hot to cold immediately relieves the itch and it lasts for hours. I can take it pretty hot, so I almost give myself burns, but its worth it.


Well I had my house tented for bed bugs. It cost me $2600. My home is about 2000 sq ft. They said it wasn’t necessary to wash anything unlike some of the other treatments. It is more than worth it to me as long as it works. I haven’t stayed in my house for over a week now. I’m still itching, but no new bites. Is that common, to still itch for so long afterwards? I just don’t feel comfy/cozy at home any more. I don’t want to be here. I’m seriously thinking of selling or renting my home and moving out. I’ll keep you posted as to whether it worked or not as soon as I can start staying home again.
The safest and most effective approach to getting rid of bed bugs is heat treatment, in which a trained professional heats the home's rooms one by one to a temperature of 50 degrees Celsius and sustains the heat for four hours. Heat does not penetrate well into wall voids, though, so desiccant dusts are often applied to those areas. No single technique can eliminate bed bugs—combinations of approaches are essential to getting the job done.
We helped a girl who we ran into who was being beaten by her B/F. She and her daughter stayed one night, and we got them to a safe place. Now we have bed bugs. I threw away our bed. (Our guest had used one of our blankets.) Thank God my landlord is going to get an exterminator! It’s at least $300 for them to come in. And yes, the itch is unbearable.
Hi all Im sitting here at 3 in the morning itching away got first bite 3 days ago I know the apt upstairs was heat treated 10 days ago I guess they traveled down here. glad I found this site yesterday I went all around with a hand held heat gun all over base boards and any cracks I can find also vacum three times I will do it all again tomorrow stay tuned Jack
Bedbugs are small, flat, wingless insects with six legs that, like mosquitoes, feed on blood from animals or people. They range in color from almost white to brown, but they turn rusty red after feeding. The common bedbug doesn't grow much longer than 0.2 inches (0.5 centimeters) and can be seen by the naked eye to the astute observer.  Bedbugs get their name because they like to hide in bedding and mattresses.
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