Chances are, you or someone you know has had a run-in with bed bugs. It might have happened in a scrupulously clean bedroom. Or maybe it was a hotel room, office or college dorm. In the February issue of Scientific American entomologist Kenneth Haynes of the University of Kentucky explains how, after a lengthy absence, bed bugs are staging a comeback. The good news is scientists are intensively studying these insects, and their insights suggest novel ways of detecting the bugs and eradicating infestations. Some of those potential solutions are a long way off, however. In the meantime the best bet is to avoid bringing bed bugs home in the first place. I called Haynes to ask him how to do that and what to do if one suspects an infestation (eek!), among a bunch of other practical-minded questions.
Thanks so much to the person who mentioned the hot/cold water method! I think when you do it when you first notice the bites, It will keep them from becoming huge, itchy welts! I run hot water over the bites and I feel a sense of relief, as if I’m scratching the bite, without actually scratching it. The area turns pink, and I keep going until the relief sensation has subsided, then I run cold water over the area. Works great and it does last for hours!
My daughter stayed at a friends for 2 nights…. And brought home bedbugs!! She has bites from the top of her head to her feet. The itching must be horrific. Poor child. After 2 days of not being able to stop the itching, as a last resort (on a Sun at 11pm) I told her to use a bathroom spray cleaner that had bleach in it. She only put it on her legs, but the itching stopped there, just not on arms, stomach or in her head. Don’t recommend bleach but she was able to get a couple hours of sleep. I will try several things to try to help her that I have read from previous comments. Thanks everyone….
Wash all things washable and leave in HOT dryer for at least 20 minutes. The old timers used to sun dry and air their hand made quilts outside in the sun all day and bring them in before the dew would start to settle. they also did their mattresses and pillows and cushions and this must have heated up things a bit but be careful that the sun doesn’t fade the color.
I have read about this remedy online but i haven’t tried it yet but i think it will work pretty well . After u have been bitten and u find the bites in the morning on ur body , if ur itching , its going to make it worse so try not to scratch but if u cant help yourself , i have this remedy ! Ok , so put vinegar onto ur fingers and dab it at the spots..its a great itch-relief (if thats a word) !
I am trying to type this and get relief at the same time from the terrible itching that has robbed me of my sleep for several nights now….Anyway, now as I said, my new recliner is ruined because even after covering it with plastic and then covering with a new sheet I just took out of the package, it still was stained with vaseline I had put on my arms from all the bites and itching I’m going through…I also resorted to covering it with corn starch which seems to brush right off, but I’m afraid the vaseline is here to stay…I’m heartbroken about my recliner and the whole mess in general!!
The Internet abounds with so-called miracle cures for bed bugs. But bed bugs are hard to get rid of, so anything that advertises an immediate solution is not accurate—it's snake oil. These "cures" have included (as reported by pest control operators who come in afterward to tackle bed bugs correctly) using bleach, ammonia and even DIY heat treatment, which carries fire risk.
The symptoms of a bedbug bite are usually mild when present, and often individuals will not experience any symptoms at all. Bedbug bites can occur on any exposed part of the body, with the face, neck, arms, and hands being areas commonly affected. The signs and symptoms can appear from minutes to days after the initial bite. Affected individuals will usually complain of localized itching and reddish-colored skin lesions, which may look like a flat welt or a raised bump. Sometimes, the lesions can be found in clusters or in a linear pattern. Typically, these skin lesions will go away after one to two weeks.

A number of other symptoms may occur from either the bite of the bed bugs or from their exposure. Anaphylaxis from the injection of serum and other nonspecific proteins has been rarely documented.[5][10] Due to each bite taking a tiny amount of blood, chronic or severe infestation may lead to anemia.[5] Bacterial skin infection may occur due to skin break down from scratching.[5][11] Systemic poisoning may occur if the bites are numerous.[12] Exposure to bed bugs may trigger an asthma attack via the effects of airborne allergens although evidence of this association is limited.[5] There is no evidence that bed bugs transmit infectious diseases[5][7] even though they appear physically capable of carrying pathogens and this possibility has been investigated.[5][3] The bite itself may be painful thus resulting in poor sleep and worse work performance.[5]
Blood spots found on one’s sheets, bites and the presence of bed bug feces and cast skins are some of the indications of a bed bug infestation. Bites are commonly found on the parts of the body that are more likely to be exposed to bed bugs during sleep – the hands, neck, face, shoulders, legs and arms. While not always the case, bed bug bites are often grouped together in a small area and at times may occur in a line or a zigzag pattern. Bites normally look like small, flat or raised areas that may become inflamed, itchy, red or blistered. Bed bug bite reactions don’t always appear immediately after you’re bitten and may take a few days to begin causing symptoms. However, not everyone reacts to bed bug bites in the same manner.
×