Hi, I am from the United states and have recently travelled to Poland. Decided to stay in an AirBnb in Warsaw. Everything was okay until a couple of days into the stay when I noticed what seemed like a very small cluster of small bites in the crook of my neck. Stranger still, on the opposite side of my neck, in the same location, there was another very small cluster of small bites. Ofcourse, I panicked. Washed everything three times, etc. The next few days, it seemed a couple of more would appear in the same area. In the crook region of my neck. But, NOT on my legs, feet, stomach, hands. Keep in mind, I sleep with very little clothes and thought it was weird that this “skin reaction” was not any where else. I did start wearing a new product in my hair and exactly where my hair falls usually, is pretty much where these little “bumps” appeared. I did try to do little experiments to test out the theory that I may just be having a skin reaction to a hair product. One night, after donning almost little to nothing sleepwear, I rubbed lemon juice all over my neck. The next morning, I did feel slightly better but I believe maybe one or two very small bites after I washed it. Lately, I’ve been securely wrapping my neck and covering it when I go to sleep and have recently stopped using said new product in my hair. The bumps seem to be darkening and going away and as usual, found nowhere else on my body. Occassionally, after running the crook of my neck area, it feels like one or two very small bumps will appear. I dont know. Is this a new level of highly sophisticated bed bugs that I’m dealing with? Or is it just a skin reaction and my mind is playing invisible bug warfare on me? Please note. I do not have lice and these very small bumps I mentioned before are way further down from my scalp. Crook of neck area. Just a little higher than where my collar bone is. Please advise. Have you heard of anything like this?


In most infestations, consultation with a professional exterminator is advised because elimination is more likely to be effective if multiple pest management methods are used. These include monitoring devices, canine detection, clutter removal, vacuuming, heat or cold treatment, sealing cracks and crevices, and judicious use of nonchemical and chemical pesticides. Monitoring devices include moat-like devices (e.g., Climbup Insect Interceptor) that trap bedbugs ascending and descending furniture legs, and emitting devices that use carbon dioxide, heat, and/or chemicals (e.g., Nightwatch monitor) that attract and trap bedbugs. Specially trained dogs are reported to detect bedbugs with 97 percent accuracy and are able to differentiate live bedbugs and viable eggs from debris remaining from previous infestations.41 Vacuuming is a highly effective method for removing bedbugs, but not eggs because these adhere to surfaces.42 High-efficiency particulate air filters eliminate bedbug allergens and debris.42  Nonchemical treatments include petroleum jelly (which can be applied to legs of furniture to prevent bedbugs from ascending), heating, and freezing (see Table 36 for effective killing temperatures).
My boyfriend is staying with a man who rents a room out in his house. The last tenants had bed bugs and the living room couch and everything is infested and theyve been gone for a month. The bugs were dormant until a week or two ago. The man has sprayed the house with something that is supposed to kill bed bugs yet my boyfriend is continuously being bitten. We counted around 100 bites. They are swollen and the itching is making him crazy. He is unable to sleep at night. We are trying to convince the man to just throw the couch out. Since he has no carpet we believe the couch is their main breeding ground and the sprays DID NOT WORK.
Bed bugs remain a problematic pest across the United States, beyond just bed bug bites. In fact, one out of five Americans has  had a bed bug infestation in their home or knows someone who has encountered bed bugs. Reflecting the increasing problem with bed bugs,  a survey of pest management professionals found that prior to 2000 only 25 percent had encountered bed bug infestations, but in 2013 an amazing 99.6 percent of U.S. based professional pest management companies encountered bed bug infestations. Bed bugs are found in places beyond homes and hotels, such as hospitals, schools, doctors' offices, public transportation, college dorms, day cares, offices and any other places where humans live or gather.
Bedbug bites usually do not require any treatment. If you develop itching of the skin around the site of the bite, you can use an over-the-counter antihistamine pill or cream such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl). Some individuals may also experience relief from the itching by applying a hot washcloth directly to the affected area. Try to avoid scratching the skin, as this can cause skin breakdown and a subsequent secondary bacterial skin infection.
First off you should ALWAYS go to pest control if you think you have bedbugs! You shouldn’t try and get rid of them yourself, 99% of the time it does not work. Plus even if you removed infected areas and wash them it wouldn’t kill the eggs. Plus bedbugs are very easy to get but very hard to get rid of. So you should never do it yourself it won’t work!
The bites themselves don't usually pose any major health risk since bedbugs are not known to spread diseases, but an allergic reaction to the bites may require medical attention, CDC officials say. There have also been some strange cases linked to bedbug infestations. Researchers reported in the Canadian Medical Association Journal in 2009 that they treated a 60-year-old man for anemia caused by blood loss from bedbug bites. Another study published in 1991 in the Journal of the Egyptian Society of Parasitology found that people with asthma might be more susceptible to allergic reactions from bedbug bites.
According to textile experts (Drycleaning & Laundry Institute, Laurel, MD), most garments designated as ‘dry-clean only’ (e.g., cotton, wool, silk, linen, rayon, nylon) will not be harmed provided they are dry before being placed in a clothes dryer at a moderate temperature setting. Dry cleaning procedures also kill bed bugs, but there is a risk of infesting the establishment when buggy items are tagged and sorted. 
Never treat any bedding, mattress, etc. with anything other than the treatments listed: borax, enzyme cleaner, Comet, sodium borate. Other pesticides and exterminating fluids can be harmful to humans. Even so, bedding and mattresses treated with chemicals such as borax or Comet should be left outside to dry naturally in the sun, then wrapped in plastic before next use, so as not to irritate the skin.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

I am 60 .My only knowledge of bed bugs had been tbe old tune don’t let the bed bugs bite. I am having a serious reactionn to their bite . I have red blotches which turned into deep red pus filled holes . I am embarassed about going to the doctor. The bites are painful. I have them just about everywhere. I did just a bout everything . The purchase of high priced bed bug insecticides did nothing except poison me. I was bitten while treating a second time. These pests are horrible . They feel like stickers in my clothing. I am losing my mind. I stay in my room letting no one in. I dont want to spread these creatures to anyone. I do not kniw what to.do . I am becoming sick physically. How can I heat my home to the temputure required to kill them? Does anyone know about the product Bed Bug Barrier? They are not that much but it didnt say how many would be needed
An OTC antiseptic medication can be used for skin irritation that may then develop into an infection. As a precaution, do not use creams on broken or infected skin. If you have already been scratching, do not use these products on any raw or weeping areas. If you see signs of a skin infection, such as redness, don't use these creams in that area, and call your doctor.
Excessively scratching the itchy, bitten areas also may increase the chance of a secondary skin infection. Antiseptic creams or lotions can be used to ward off infection and antihistamines can be used to treat the itching. And an infestation can take a psychological toll on those affected: People whose homes have been infested with bedbugs may have trouble sleeping for fear of being bitten in the night. There are also public health, social and economic consequences; office buildings and schools often have to close if they are dealing with a bedbug infestation.

Flea bites are caused by the parasitic insect, the flea. The most common species of flea in the US is the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis. Signs and symptoms of flea bites in humans include itching, hives, a rash with bumps, red spots with a "halo," and swelling around the bite. Treatment for flea bites includes over-the-counter medicine and natural and home remedies to relieve and soothe itching and inflammation. The redness of a flea bite can last from a few hours to a several days.
Claude suggested a “hot as you can stand it” shower or bath to treat the bites. The itching will intensify for a few seconds, but then there is the relief which lasts for many hours. Some believe that the heat from the water overloads the ends of your nerves and prevent them from telling your brain to itch. Some think that the heat causes your body to release more histamine than usual and thereby less histamine around the bite. Whatever the reason, it’s commonly used as a solution to itching caused by bites.
One bed bug will usually take more than one bite. Once a bed bug inserts its mouthparts and finds a suitable blood vessel, it will begin feeding. However, finding the right blood vessel may take more than one injection into the skin. In addition, bed bugs are very sensitive to movement by the host they are feeding on. Therefore, if a sleeping person moves, a feeding bed bug will probably withdraw its mouthparts and begin its search for a blood meal on another part of the body. It’s important to remember that the number of bites a person receives is not indicative of the number of bed bugs that feed on that person.
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