Hey I went to visit friends this Saturday and Sunday. Saturday I slept fine Sunday I slept in a different location, I kept feeling bites but was unsure through the night. I woke up the next morning with red bumbs like two clusters of three and four on one arm, four on my other arm not far apart, four on my leg, three on my lower back. As they day went by they got bigger like lumps and really itchy, I had benedryl and creme I could not sleep last night at all. Some of them hurt a bit I try not to scratch them. Ooh and three on my face, my skin is very sensitive, my friends sat on the same chair I sleep on noone got bit. How long does the itching last, Iaautomatically knew it had to be bed bugs does it sound like them??
Luckily, I just discovered this website giving great advice regarding all the pink, itchy bumps and welts on some parts of my body – and I never experienced problems with bed bugs before until now! So far, I’ve only seen one. But, I’m blessed to already have many of the home remedies for cleaning my sofabed, where I got bit from the bug(s), and started working on treating the irritating bites. I hope to get back to let everybody know how things go.

I can’t wear any of my rings because my fingers have gotten swollen and they hurt. My wrists have become somewhat painful as well. I get blood blisters that hurt like anything. Those are the worst. I’m living on benadryl and calamine lotion. The calamine seems to be helping to dry them out at least. My right hand is a disaster. Especially on the skin between thumb and forefinger. I look like I’m a leper or something.
Maybe before you go fear mongering, you should at least Google whatever your about to say that makes you look bad? First read above. Second to answer your question how did you say it….. oh yes ……. Is the blood cleaned by the bed bug when sucked up from infected people? Well the answer is yes and no. HIV can’t live very long at all once the blood has been exposed to air much less been digested by something(ick).
In the case of beds, a more economical option is to encase both the mattress and box spring in a protective cover like those used for allergy relief. Encasements specifically designed to help protect against bed bugs are available through retail or pest control firms. Higher quality ones tend to be more durable and comfortable to sleep on. Once the encasement is installed and zipped shut, any bugs which happen to be inside are entombed and eventually will die. Encasements also help protect newly purchased beds, and make it easier to spot and destroy any bugs residing on the outer surface during subsequent examination. Encasements will not, however, keep bed bugs from crawling onto a bed and biting a sleeping person.

The decline of bed bug populations in the 20th century is often credited to potent pesticides that had not previously been widely available.[44] Other contributing factors that are less frequently mentioned in news reports are increased public awareness and slum clearance programs that combined pesticide use with steam disinfection, relocation of slum dwellers to new housing, and in some cases also follow-up inspections for several months after relocated tenants moved into their new housing.[66]


After a few minutes of hot water therapy, use cool water on the bites. You may alternate hot and cool water several times until itching is minimal or gone. Finish with cool water and apply aloes to bites. You will have several hours of relief. My doctor told me the hot water releases the histamine in the skin glands and it tales several hours to refill the glands. About bee stings: I had a extreme reaction to one wasp sting several years ago. Last year I was attacked and suffered over 60+ bites on my face, neck and upper body. I raced into the house and jumped into to shower and opened the hot water full blast.
As if you needed something else to worry about, bedbugs, those pests from the old bedtime rhyme are making a comeback. More of a nuisance than a health hazard, they’re showing up to suck blood from people in hotels, college dorms, and hospitals. Take an informative look at bedbugs: what they are, where they lurk, and how to spot them before they get you.
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