Hi, I’m a little late to the talk but this is honestly very strange to me, i had bed bugs about a year ago and fully got rid of them, as of yesterday, 9/10, i woke up to bites on my right hand, palm and fingers not on the top of my hand, and on my right foot, in between my toes and the soles of my foot. i thought it may be bed bugs because of having 3 days so maybe one of them jumped on my bed and brought one along, but i decided to sleep one more night, i now got bit on me left hand and feet the same as my other bites, only on my toes soles palms and fingers, they’re red bumps that itch and whenever they’re pressed along something they hurt, if they are bed bugs why aren’t they like how i had them last time where i got bit everywhere there wasn’t hair, now I’m only getting bit in those spots, hopefully my info helps! Thanks!

Hi! Ms. Natasha Every morning when I wake up I could see new bites in me at first the bites were located at my legs now Ithere are bites in my arms some. Two bites or some are in straight pattern with 1-2 inches away from each bites. I remember my sister went to mow with my father when she arrived home we noticed red bites in circular and linear pattern then when we woke up her legs are covered with bites. Now she is healing after like five days. I noticed mine started a day after hers or 2days. The. Some of my bites will get hard and will itch at the sides. Ill send a picture to you,
No. Bed bugs are also pests in poultry operations, and they're known to parasitize bats. Some labs that study bed bugs rear them on guinea pigs and mice. The bugs might feed on cats and dogs. Fur is probably a barrier to them, but they could feed at any place on the body without fur. Bed bugs are not specific to humans, but they are adapted to parasitizing us.
Bed bugs are active mainly at night. During the daytime, they prefer to hide close to where people sleep. Their flattened bodies enable them to fit into tiny crevices--especially those associated with mattresses, box springs, bed frames and headboards. Bed bugs do not have nests like ants or bees, but do tend to congregate in habitual hiding places. Characteristically, these areas are marked by dark spotting and staining, which is the dried excrement of the bugs. Also present will be hatched and un-hatched eggs, the tannish shed skins of maturing nymphs, and the bugs themselves. Another possible sign are rusty or reddish smears on bed sheets or mattresses from crushed engorged bed bugs. Although it’s often stated that bed bugs have a telltale “buggy” odor, the smell is seldom evident except in extreme infestations and should not be relied upon for detection.

Don’t forget that in some cases a person does not react to bed bug bites at all. It’s really not that easy to easily identify bed bug bites. Often a diagnosis of spider bite is given when the person really doesn’t know what is causing the lesion(s). Spider bites are often an over diagnosed condition. Also, a hot or warm dryer is much more useful than washing clothes in hot water. Certain studies have shown that some bed bugs will withstand the wash, but not the dryer.


As bed bugs grow they molt, shedding their skin five times before reaching maturity. A blood meal is needed between each successive molt. Adult females also must feed in order to lay eggs. Under favorable conditions (70-80°F), the bugs can mature fully in as little as a month, producing multiple generations per year. Cooler temperatures or limited access to blood prolong the development time. 
Adult bedbugs are reddish brown in color, flat, oval-shaped, wingless and approximately 4-5 millimeters in length. Immature bedbugs (nymphs) may be translucent or light tan in color and therefore very difficult to see. Bedbugs are often more red in color after feeding. Bedbugs are attracted by warmth, and they generally feed during the night, often just before dawn. They tend to feed every five to 10 days, though they can survive without feeding for several months. Bedbugs pierce the skin and inject saliva that contains anesthetics and anticoagulants into the host, which often make their bites painless initially. After feeding on the host's blood for several minutes, bedbugs will crawl back to their hiding place. They will generally try to hide and remain within close range of their warm-blooded host. Affected individuals may feel and see the consequences of the bedbug bite afterward, though many individuals will not develop any physical signs of a bite. Bedbugs do not transmit or spread human disease.
I live in a high rise apt bldg. There have been reports of bed bugs since I moved in two years ago. Recently it was my turn. I see no bugs, but man o man did they have a feast on my legs, and inner thighs. I went for the ammonia trick. The only thing I had was window cleaner. It helped stopped the itch temporarily. Then I’m good for some hours. When the itch comes back, I douse again in Blue window cleaner again. Strange but true.

Insecticides might also have their work cut out for them: Entomologists have known that the common bedbug has built up resistance to some typical insecticides such as those containing certain pyrethroid chemicals like deltamethrin, according to Entomology Today. Deltamethrin apparently paralyzes an insect's nervous system, according to Cornell University.

Caregivers, firefighters, and other service providers are sometimes required to enter and work in bed bug-infested dwellings. In doing so, there is the potential to transport some bugs home or to the workplace. It should be noted that bed bugs do not fly, nor jump onto people/pets as fleas do. During the day, bed bugs usually remain hidden and immobile, becoming more active at night when seeking a host. Consequently, the chance of picking up bed bugs by merely walking into an infested dwelling during the day is unlikely. The risk may increase while providing care but can be lessened by taking some precautions. 
Run hot water as hot as you can take it. When its hot enough for you, run the hot water over your bites. Yes it does burn a little, but you’ll feel relief from the hot water drawing the “itch” out. Do this for about 10-15 seconds and then immediately switch to very cold water and run that over it. The shock to your skin from going from hot to cold immediately relieves the itch and it lasts for hours. I can take it pretty hot, so I almost give myself burns, but its worth it.
The problem with this idea of yours the BuggedOut’s Bed Bud AIDS Cure Dialysis Machine is that the blood in a bed bug is dead blood. That is why it is red and since HIV is a virus which is also alive it guess what…. yep you guessed it ^_< Live Blood which has Live white blood cells in it which is where HIV the virus that gives you AIDS lives and when they die………………. get the picture. The second problem and also the reason HIV hasn’t been cured yet is even if we could clean HIV from the blood with Dialysis or some other method like the medicine they prescribe today, is that HIV is able to move between what is called the blood brain barrier where we are unable to do, with medication or any other means and so the HIV virus hides in it and even if your bed bug machine was to work and you cleaned the blood of HIV and then put it back in the person soon as it you did the virus would come running out the brain barrier to greet & infect it………
Some pest control firms utilize specialized heating equipment to de-infest furnishings, rooms, and entire dwellings. The procedure involves heating up the infested item or area to temperatures lethal to bed bugs. Portable heaters and fans are used to gradually heat the air to about 120 - 130°F while monitoring with strategically placed sensors. By carefully controlling the temperature, bugs and eggs are killed wherever they may be without damaging household items. 

Hi, I am from the United states and have recently travelled to Poland. Decided to stay in an AirBnb in Warsaw. Everything was okay until a couple of days into the stay when I noticed what seemed like a very small cluster of small bites in the crook of my neck. Stranger still, on the opposite side of my neck, in the same location, there was another very small cluster of small bites. Ofcourse, I panicked. Washed everything three times, etc. The next few days, it seemed a couple of more would appear in the same area. In the crook region of my neck. But, NOT on my legs, feet, stomach, hands. Keep in mind, I sleep with very little clothes and thought it was weird that this “skin reaction” was not any where else. I did start wearing a new product in my hair and exactly where my hair falls usually, is pretty much where these little “bumps” appeared. I did try to do little experiments to test out the theory that I may just be having a skin reaction to a hair product. One night, after donning almost little to nothing sleepwear, I rubbed lemon juice all over my neck. The next morning, I did feel slightly better but I believe maybe one or two very small bites after I washed it. Lately, I’ve been securely wrapping my neck and covering it when I go to sleep and have recently stopped using said new product in my hair. The bumps seem to be darkening and going away and as usual, found nowhere else on my body. Occassionally, after running the crook of my neck area, it feels like one or two very small bumps will appear. I dont know. Is this a new level of highly sophisticated bed bugs that I’m dealing with? Or is it just a skin reaction and my mind is playing invisible bug warfare on me? Please note. I do not have lice and these very small bumps I mentioned before are way further down from my scalp. Crook of neck area. Just a little higher than where my collar bone is. Please advise. Have you heard of anything like this?
Bring in only what is needed, and avoid sitting or placing coats and other items on beds, floors and sofas where the bugs commonly reside. Essential items can be placed on a tabletop or other hard surface, preferably away from bedrooms and sleeping areas. Better to sit on a hard (non-upholstered) chair than on sofas and recliners. Also try to avoid leaning or brushing against beds and upholstered furniture. If such items are carried out of infested dwellings (e.g., by sanitation workers or firefighters), it’s best to wrap them in plastic or at least not hold them against your body during transport. Emergency Medical (EMS) personnel may need to take additional precautions, such as removing a patient’s bed bug-infested shoes or clothing, or installing plastic sheeting before transporting them in the emergency vehicle.    
The common bed bug (C. lectularius) is the species best adapted to human environments. It is found in temperate climates throughout the world. Other species include Cimex hemipterus, found in tropical regions, which also infests poultry and bats, and Leptocimex boueti, found in the tropics of West Africa and South America, which infests bats and humans. Cimex pilosellus and Cimex pipistrella primarily infest bats, while Haematosiphon inodora, a species of North America, primarily infests poultry.[42]
If you arrive home and discover that you have brought some unwanted guests home with you, immediately notify the hotel of your discovery. Having a possible infestation in hotels and motels can be a public relations nightmare for the owners. Politely ask them to pay for any and all costs incurred to rid your clothing and home of a possible new infestation.

One bed bug will usually take more than one bite. Once a bed bug inserts its mouthparts and finds a suitable blood vessel, it will begin feeding. However, finding the right blood vessel may take more than one injection into the skin. In addition, bed bugs are very sensitive to movement by the host they are feeding on. Therefore, if a sleeping person moves, a feeding bed bug will probably withdraw its mouthparts and begin its search for a blood meal on another part of the body. It’s important to remember that the number of bites a person receives is not indicative of the number of bed bugs that feed on that person.
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