I have various skin lesions which might or might not be bed-bug bites–small, raised, sometimes red, sometimes itchy. The problem is I live right next door to a large park and get all kinds of insects in summer, may small enough to get through my window-screen. Also, I have Parkinson’s disease, and the meds I take for it can produce hives and itching as a side-effect. And, my bedding and mattress are all dark colored, so I likely would not see fecal stains or shed bed-bug skins.

Since DDT was banned there has been an escaltion of bugs. Malaria is killing millions and now bed bugs are taking over. I am waiting for a exterminaor right now. Something is biting me and I cannot find out what it is. I know Benadryl itch stopping cream has been my salvation. I have order a few things from an online shopping network and wonder if we are getting these bugs from other countrys. I am stopping all shopping online. The only way I feel like something is on me is to take a shower. Where is the CDC on this problem.


One bed bug will usually take more than one bite. Once a bed bug inserts its mouthparts and finds a suitable blood vessel, it will begin feeding. However, finding the right blood vessel may take more than one injection into the skin. In addition, bed bugs are very sensitive to movement by the host they are feeding on. Therefore, if a sleeping person moves, a feeding bed bug will probably withdraw its mouthparts and begin its search for a blood meal on another part of the body. It’s important to remember that the number of bites a person receives is not indicative of the number of bed bugs that feed on that person.
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